Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

Working in North Worksop

For most people in Worksop the choices that lay before them leaving school were limited.

Leslie Jarvis has written a very poignant poem on starting to work at the pit in 1930….

Why me?

A bottle of water,
A tin full of snap.
Ragged old trousers
And a broken-peaked cap.
Eyes all aching
For the want of sleep.
Ready to work in coalpit deep.

Why all this action
At crack of dawn?
Standing on the pit bank,
A figure forlorn.

I should be at school
Sat at a desk,
Round about nine.
Not waiting, all sleepy,
To go down the mine.

Reproduced with kind permission of the family.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

Peter left school in 1943 and went to work at Baddily’s Farm, which was where the Larwood estate is now. His job included ploughing with horses, milking, and general farm work. He later became a tractor and lorry driver, taking sugar beet to the Kelham factory. Some men, like Peter, were needed to work at RAF Scofton. The planes were Vampires and Meteors and Peter’s job was to maintain and fuel the meteors.

 Women mostly worked at the big factories on the north side of the town, and the friendships and romances from there have lasted many years. Pauline’s parents met at the Glassworks on Sandy Lane. Her dad worked there for forty-four years as a sorter and her mum worked in the canteen. Pauline herself worked at Steel and Garland and her husband at Bairnswear.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

Like many others June was at Batchelors and has very happy memories of the annual trip to Blackpool. They chartered a train and enjoyed a free lunch and tea at the Winter Gardens.

Sylvia moved to Carr Fasteners after struggling with the adding up at the Beehive Stores, Herbert Smith’s Drapers on Victoria Square, fondly remembered by many for its overhead cash carrier.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Carr Fasteners Co. Shireoaks Road, Worksop 1960-61

Carr Fasteners had opened a new section called “The Barriers” and Sylvia recounts:

“We were an unruly gang, I can remember us belting out 'Diana'”

(Paul Anker’s song ‘Diana’ was a big hit in 1957).

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Photo shared by Ben of his workmates at General Descaling Company 1958.

Ben tells of working on the maintenance team at Victoria Hospital:

“Part of my job was to work on the ducting beneath the hospital - in places you had to crawl or crouch down. There was a basement storeroom with the names of the hospital benefactors on - names like Bannister and Bartrop that many will remember from being on the wards named after them, also Joseph Garside, a benefactor of the church too.”

Lynn recounts the drama of the fire in the old Maltings building that stood where Aldi is now:

“It was derelict but the ground floor was being used for small businesses. We went to help my “Uncle Alan” get his flammable photographic equipment out of his shop in front on Gateford Road. The heat from the fire made the glass in his back windows too hot to touch. I remember seeing two men who had a car respraying business running out through the archway to the Maltings, straining under the weight of the enormous oxyacetylene tanks on their backs. It was like a scene from a movie.”

Worksop has many sons and daughters who have done well in the world of work. Our area has its share of stories of those who have been successful – rising to management positions in local firms like Genefax or Wilco, or founding new ventures like John’s son who now runs the international Go-Kart circuit. The famous golfer Lee Westwood was at Sir Edmund Hillary Primary School and Valley Comprehensive School.