Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

People

George Savile Foljambe

Benefactor

1800 – 1869

The Blind Squire: Founder, principal benefactor and patron of St John’s, Worksop. A generous and kindly landowner who was instrumental in bringing St John’s into being.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Memorial in Scofton Church
Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

Selina, Viscountess Milton

Benefactor

1812 – 1883

A redoubtable Lady who energised the Church committee into action through her fundraising efforts and her offer to purchase the building site for the new church.

Joseph Garside

Benefactor

1820 – 1893

‘Mr Worksop’ A sawyer by trade, an entrepreneur by inclination, and a man of his time. The driving force behind the building of St John’s, president of the Worksop & Retford Brewery Co. Ltd. and Chairman of the local Board of Health from 1858 – 1877

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

Gabbitas

Chairmakers and Parishioners

For a century Worksop was at the centre of the production of Windsor Chairs. Rare examples are eagerly sought by collectors and can change hands for thousands of pounds, but these chairs were made for everyday use in small workshops by craftsmen utilising plentiful supplies of timber and the skills handed down for generations from Master craftsman to apprentice.

Edith Robbins

First in the St John’s Church Register

Worship began to take place well before the building of St John’s Church got underway. Families were drawn to Worksop from the surrounding countryside by the new opportunities for employment that came with the increased industrialisation. Some of these families settled in the town, others moved on again in search of a better life.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.

The Rev Charles Bury

First vicar of St John’s

Connections between families, especially in small towns sometimes lead to new opportunities and sometimes lead to marriage.

The Rev George Dobree

The longest serving vicar of St John’s

The Church Pastoral Aid Society was established in 1836 to support parish clergy facing the rapid social change brough about by the industrial revolution. The objective was to provide vicars with curates to assist them in their work in parishes to ‘take the gospel to everyman’s door’ Rev Dobree was an exemplar of a vicar who was devoted to the people of his parish.

Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
Thanks to a very generous grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, we can restore the “at risk” spire of our beautiful building and explore the rich heritage of our church and its community.
William and Walter Straw with their parents, William, and Florence in the early years of the 20th Century. Reproduced with kind permission from National Trust, Mr Straw’s House. © National Trust / John William Brown.

The Straws

Worshippers & Wardens

William and Walter Straw upheld the values of Edwardian England for their entire lives, despite seeing man walk on the moon and observing six monarchs appear and disappear from the coins that changed hands over the counter of the family grocery shop. For all of their adult lives they were devoted congregants of St John’s Church.